MANUFACTURE HISTORY

RE-EDITION
AIRPLANE MUG

“TRADITION IS NOT THE KEEPING OF ASHES, BUT IT IS STOPPING THE FLAME”

JEAN JAURÈS

2022

The new MANDORLA collection brings back memories because the decor is modeled on industrially used mudguards that are intended to protect walls and floors from excessive wear and tear. The Stuttgart artist Reiner Xaver Sedelmeier inspired KPM chief designer Thomas Wenzel to create an artistic collaboration in which seemingly banal everyday design is transferred to high-quality porcelain.

2018

The KPM to-go cup is considered a symbol of a lived symbiosis of tradition and zeitgeist, style and environmental awareness and is the most commercially successful product since the manufacturer was founded.

2017

KPM Berlin initiates a collaboration with the artist Stefan Marx , bringing together contemporary art with traditional craftsmanship.

KPM Berlin initiates a collaboration with the artist Stefan Marx , bringing together contemporary art with traditional craftsmanship.

Frederick the Great founded the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin. There had previously been attempts to establish a production facility for white gold in Prussia's capital. But both the wool manufacturer Wilhelm Casparwegely and his successor, the merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky, had to stop production due to financial difficulties despite royal support. Frederick the Great, who had long wanted to own a company that produced valuable and representative porcelain, paid a considerable sum for the takeover. He gives the factory its name and his symbol, the royal scepter.

LEARN MORE:
The food culture of the Prussian king

The king is his own best customer. Frederick the Great commissioned 21 services with up to 500 individual pieces and artistic centerpieces for his palaces. The models RELIEFZIERAT, NEUZIERAT, ROCAILLE and NEUOSIER are developed, among others. In terms of design and color, they are coordinated with the interior of the castles. Frederick's state gifts also often come from the factory and can be found on the tables of European royal families and in the Russian tsar's house. High-ranking guests of the Federal President still dine at the Rocaille Service at Bellevue Palace.

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Peter von Biron, Duke of Courland, commissions the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin to design a magnificent table service. To this day, the KURLAND collection , with its strict classicist shape and a relief made of antique cloth hangings, egg bars and pearl rims, is one of the manufactory's bestsellers and is considered to be the most important classicism collection in the world. The KURLAND border also adorns today To-go cups and curry sausage bowls made from white gold. A KURLAND service is available at Charlottenburg Palace for larger state receptions .

Read more ...

After the death of Frederick the Great in 1786, Friedrich Wilhelm II took over the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin and turned it into a technologically leading company - with Berlin's first steam engine and horse-powered glaze mills. Economically, the manufactory is going uphill.

Karl Friedrich Schinkel , Johann Gottfried Schadow and Christian Daniel Rauch shape the design of the KPM porcelains. Their designs are no longer playful as they were in the Rococo era, but are based on ancient shapes with clear contours and harmonious proportions. The group of princesses based on a design by Johan Gottfried Schadow dates from this time . The elaborately crafted statue made up of 88 individual pieces shows Crown Princess Luise of Prussia and her sister Friederike. The Schinkel basket by Karl Friedrich Schinkel with a filigree openwork basketwork, which is still produced today, is part of a service that Friedrich Wilhelm III. ordered for the wedding of his eldest daughter.

Friedrich Wilhelm IV, a lover of the fine arts, becomes Prussian king and owner of the KPM Berlin. The “Romantic on the Throne” orders new editions of the Rococo collections that Frederick the Great had already commissioned from the manufactory.

KPM Berlin opens its first store. For this purpose, the factory's warehouse will be converted into a representative sales gallery with showcases, shelves and shop windows.

The KPM Berlin has to give way to the construction of the Prussian state parliament and leave its location near Potsdamer Platz. It is moving to the edge of the Tiergarten, which has a big advantage: the new production facility with a modern ring chamber furnace is located directly on the Spree and can be reached for transport by ship. From 1878 onwards, the chemical-technical research institute was affiliated with the manufactory, with the help of which the manufactory was able to significantly expand its repertoire of shapes and colors and produce innovations such as a new type of porcelain mass, underglaze colors and colored glazes. The laboratory porcelains from the research institute were the inspiration for the LAB series by Thomas Wenzel .

The designers at KPM Berlin turn away from historicism and move towards flowing, asymmetrical and organic forms. The CERES service by the manufactory's artistic director, Theodor Schmuz-Baudiß, is today considered one of the most beautiful Art Nouveau services. It came onto the market in 1913 to mark the 150th anniversary of the manufactory.

With the abdication of the Hohenzollerns, the Royal Porcelain Manufactory became the State Porcelain Manufactory Berlin. Under its director Günther von Pechmann, chairman of the German Werkbund, the ideas of New Objectivity influence the work of KPM Berlin. The age of extensive ornamentation is over, less is more. Gerhard Marcks, Marguerite Friedländer, Trude Petri and Siegmund Schütz, among others, shape the porcelain design in the manufactory. Trude Petri's URBINO dinner service was created in 1929. When designing, Petri bases his design on the most perfect of all shapes: the sphere. URBINO was awarded the Grand Prix at the Paris World Exhibition in 1937 and is now a permanent exhibit in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Trude Petri's design ARKADIA also dates from this period, the simple form of which Siegfried Schütz - inspired by Greek mythology - decorated with medallions made of bisque porcelain. The HALLE vase shape by Marguerite Friedlaender from 1931 also follows the design ideals of New Objectivity and is a harmonious symbiosis of the geometric bodies sphere and cone.

Asymmetry and abstraction replace the strict forms of the previous Bauhaus era. In the 1990s, the collaboration with the Italian designer Enzo Mari resulted in a series of slim vases with square stainless steel feet and the BERLIN collection with concave and convex flags, which won the iF Design Award.

After several attempts at privatization, the Berlin banker Jörg Woltmann takes over the Royal Porcelain Manufactory Berlin as sole shareholder. Woltmann determined the realignment of the traditional company and accompanies the manufactory to this day.

Chief designer Thomas Wenzel is inspired by the factory's former laboratory porcelain and designs the LAB series - not a classic multi-part service, but a series of multifunctional and minimalist products for the modern kitchen laboratory. The pieces have a special tactile effect thanks to a shiny glazed top and a matt underside made of bisque porcelain. In addition to plates, bowls and cups, the LAB family also includes spice mills , mortars and a porcelain coffee filter . Each family member can be recognized not only by the timeless design language, but also by the chrome green stamp and the lettering “BERLIN”.

KPM Berlin initiates a collaboration with the artist Stefan Marx , bringing together contemporary art with traditional craftsmanship. Confirmed by the response, the manufactory has since regularly entered into creative exchanges with contemporary artists and designers and launched limited editions and products under the KPM+ label.

The KPM to-go cup is considered a symbol of a lived symbiosis of tradition and zeitgeist, style and environmental awareness and is the most commercially successful product since the manufacturer was founded.

The new MANDORLA collection brings back memories because the decor is modeled on industrially used mudguards that are intended to protect walls and floors from excessive wear and tear. The Stuttgart artist Reiner Xaver Sedelmeier inspired KPM chief designer Thomas Wenzel to create an artistic collaboration in which seemingly banal everyday design is transferred to high-quality porcelain.

On the occasion of the 260th anniversary of KPM Berlin, as a tribute to its eventful design history and one of its most important designers to date, Marguerite Friedlaender-Wildenhain, the Berlin porcelain manufacturer is introducing a real rarity of the New Objectivity with its re-edition of the airplane cup the sale. The special feature of the captivating design, which absolutely embodies Friedlaender-Wildenhain's design premise: the stand ring of the espresso cup and the recess of the saucer mesh perfectly and create a perfect, non-slip and tip-over duo in function and form.

Frederick the Great founded the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin. There had previously been attempts to establish a production facility for white gold in Prussia's capital. But both the wool manufacturer Wilhelm Casparwegely and his successor, the merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky, had to stop production due to financial difficulties despite royal support. Frederick the Great, who had long wanted to own a company that produced valuable and representative porcelain, paid a considerable sum for the takeover. He gives the factory its name and his symbol, the royal scepter.

LEARN MORE:
The food culture of the Prussian king

The king is his own best customer. Frederick the Great commissioned 21 services with up to 500 individual pieces and artistic centerpieces for his palaces. The models RELIEFZIERAT, NEUZIERAT, ROCAILLE and NEUOSIER are developed, among others. In terms of design and color, they are coordinated with the interior of the castles. Frederick's state gifts also often come from the factory and can be found on the tables of European royal families and in the Russian tsar's house. High-ranking guests of the Federal President still dine at the Rocaille Service at Bellevue Palace.

KPM on Leipziger Strasse 1763-1871

KPM Tiergarten grounds 1871-1943

KPM 1955-1998

Peter von Biron, Duke of Courland, commissions the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin to design a magnificent table service. To this day, the KURLAND collection , with its strict classicist shape and a relief made of antique cloth hangings, egg bars and pearl rims, is one of the manufactory's bestsellers and is considered to be the most important classicism collection in the world. The KURLAND border also adorns today To-go cups and curry sausage bowls made from white gold. A KURLAND service is available at Charlottenburg Palace for larger state receptions .

After the death of Frederick the Great in 1786, Friedrich Wilhelm II took over the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin and turned it into a technologically leading company - with Berlin's first steam engine and horse-powered glaze mills. Economically, the manufactory is going uphill.

Karl Friedrich Schinkel , Johann Gottfried Schadow and Christian Daniel Rauch shape the design of the KPM porcelains. Their designs are no longer playful as they were in the Rococo era, but are based on ancient shapes with clear contours and harmonious proportions. The group of princesses based on a design by Johan Gottfried Schadow dates from this time. The elaborately crafted statue made up of 88 individual pieces shows Crown Princess Luise of Prussia and her sister Friederike. The Schinkel basket by Karl Friedrich Schinkel with a filigree openwork basketwork, which is still produced today, is part of a service that Friedrich Wilhelm III. ordered for the wedding of his eldest daughter.

Friedrich Wilhelm IV, a lover of the fine arts, becomes Prussian king and owner of the KPM Berlin. The “Romantic on the Throne” orders new editions of the Rococo collections that Frederick the Great had already commissioned from the manufactory.

KPM Berlin opens its first store. For this purpose, the factory's warehouse will be converted into a representative sales gallery with showcases, shelves and shop windows.

The KPM Berlin has to give way to the construction of the Prussian state parliament and leave its location near Potsdamer Platz. It is moving to the edge of the Tiergarten, which has a big advantage: the new production facility with a modern ring chamber furnace is located directly on the Spree and can be reached for transport by ship. From 1878 onwards, the chemical-technical research institute was affiliated with the manufactory, with the help of which the manufactory was able to significantly expand its repertoire of shapes and colors and produce innovations such as a new type of porcelain mass, underglaze colors and colored glazes. The laboratory porcelains from the research institute were the inspiration for the LAB series by Thomas Wenzel .

The designers at KPM Berlin turn away from historicism and move towards flowing, asymmetrical and organic forms. The CERES service by the manufactory's artistic director, Theodor Schmuz-Baudiß, is today considered one of the most beautiful Art Nouveau services. It came onto the market in 1913 to mark the 150th anniversary of the manufactory.

Asymmetry and abstraction replace the strict forms of the previous Bauhaus era. In the 1990s, the collaboration with the Italian designer Enzo Mari resulted in a series of slim vases with square stainless steel feet and the BERLIN collection with concave and convex flags, which won the iF Design Award.

With the abdication of the Hohenzollerns, the Royal Porcelain Manufactory became the State Porcelain Manufactory Berlin. Under its director Günther von Pechmann, chairman of the German Werkbund, the ideas of New Objectivity influence the work of KPM Berlin. The age of extensive ornamentation is over, less is more. Gerhard Marcks, Marguerite Friedländer, Trude Petri and Siegmund Schütz, among others, shape the porcelain design in the manufactory. Trude Petri's URBINO dinner service was created in 1929. When designing, Petri bases his design on the most perfect of all shapes: the sphere. URBINO was awarded the Grand Prix at the Paris World Exhibition in 1937 and is now a permanent exhibit in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Trude Petri's design ARKADIA also dates from this period, the simple form of which Siegfried Schütz - inspired by Greek mythology - decorated with medallions made of bisque porcelain. The HALLE vase shape by Marguerite Friedlaender from 1931 also follows the design ideals of New Objectivity and is a harmonious symbiosis of the geometric bodies sphere and cone.

After several attempts at privatization, the Berlin banker Jörg Woltmann takes over the Royal Porcelain Manufactory Berlin as sole shareholder. Woltmann determined the realignment of the traditional company and accompanies the manufactory to this day.

Chief designer Thomas Wenzel is inspired by the factory's former laboratory porcelain and designs the LAB series - not a classic multi-part service, but a series of multifunctional and minimalist products for the modern kitchen laboratory. The pieces have a special tactile effect thanks to a shiny glazed top and a matt underside made of bisque porcelain. In addition to plates, bowls and cups, the LAB family also includes spice mills , mortars and a porcelain coffee filter . Each family member can be recognized not only by the timeless design language, but also by the chrome green stamp and the lettering “BERLIN”.

KPM Berlin initiates a collaboration with the artist Stefan Marx , bringing together contemporary art with traditional craftsmanship. Confirmed by the response, the manufactory has since regularly entered into creative exchanges with contemporary artists and designers and launched limited editions and products under theKPM+ label.

The KPM to-go cup is considered a symbol of a lived symbiosis of tradition and zeitgeist, style and environmental awareness and is the most commercially successful product since the manufacturer was founded.

The new MANDORLA collection brings back memories because the decor is modeled on industrially used mudguards that are intended to protect walls and floors from excessive wear and tear. The Stuttgart artist Reiner Xaver Sedelmeier inspired KPM chief designer Thomas Wenzel to create an artistic collaboration in which seemingly banal everyday design is transferred to high-quality porcelain.

The new MANDORLA collection brings back memories because the decor is modeled on industrially used mudguards that are intended to protect walls and floors from excessive wear and tear. The Stuttgart artist Reiner Xaver Sedelmeier inspired KPM chief designer Thomas Wenzel to create an artistic collaboration in which seemingly banal everyday design is transferred to high-quality porcelain.