THE DESIGNERS AT KPM BERLIN

In every stylistic era since its founding in 1763, outstanding creative people have designed for the Royal Porcelain Manufactory Berlin. Among them are world-famous artists such as Karl Friedrich Schinkel, Trude Petri, Marguerite Friedlaender-Wildenhain and Enzo Mari. Their designs not only shaped the history of the manufactory, but also their time - and are still groundbreaking today.

THOMAS WENZEL (*1963)

Thomas Wenzel has headed the KPM's artistic development department since 1993. In the 1990s he was involved with the Italian designer Enzo Mari in the creation of Form BERLIN , which won the iF Design Award. Wenzel's ability for interdisciplinary collaboration is evident in collaborations with partners such as Bugatti, Burmester and Bottega Veneta. In 2013, on the occasion of the manufactory's 250th anniversary, he developed the KURLAND BLANC NOUVEAU collection, whose alternation between glazed surfaces and matt reliefs creates a very special visual and tactile experience. In addition to the LAB series of minimalist, technical-looking pieces, Wenzel's current designs include the multi-award-winning KPM coffee filter and the KURLAND to-go cup, which is already considered iconic.

ENZO MARI (1932 - 2020)

Enzo Mari was one of the most intellectually formative and influential international designers of the 20th century. In his work he dealt with questions of visual perception; his style is characterized by clarity. The Milanese artist worked for KPM Berlin from 1993 to 1996. The plates and bowls in the BERLIN collection he designed during this time are based on the classic basic shape of the goblet. The accompanying jug impresses with its almost completely spherical shape, and its inverted handle gives it an innovative touch. A base made of brushed stainless steel gives the slim, ambitious MARI vases a secure stand in a modern way.

TRUDE PETRI (1906 - 1998)

After training as a potter in Hamburg, Trude Petri initially worked as a freelancer for the Berlin factory in 1928. A year later she was hired as a designer and - at just 25 years old - designed the URBINO dinner service in the New Objectivity style. At the World's Fair in Paris in 1937, the straightforward collection, based on the basic shapes of spheres and circles, won the Grand Prix and even made it into the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Trude Petri produced her last design for the manufactory in 1967: the square CADRE vase is still a bestseller today.

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SIEGMUND SCHÜTZ (1906 - 1998)

After studying sculpture and wood design, Siegmund Schütz worked as an artistic employee at KPM Berlin from 1932 to 1970. During this time he significantly influenced the design of modern porcelain. He was particularly interested in surface design: Schütz designed numerous decors as deep and flat-cut reliefs. Schütz found the motifs for sculptural relief jewelry (for example for the ARKADIA tea service designed by Trude Petri) in natural forms and models from classical antiquity.
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MARGUERITE FRIEDLAENDER-WILDENHAIN (1896-1985)

After studying at the University of Applied Arts in Berlin, Marguerite Friedlaender-Wildenhain entered the State Bauhaus in Weimar in 1919. Ten years later she became head of the ceramics workshop at the famous Burg Giebichenstein State Municipal School of Arts and Crafts in Halle. In collaboration with KPM Berlin, numerous designs for everyday porcelain were created, which were later implemented in Berlin. In 1929, for example, the minimalist mocha service HALLE or in 1931 the vase group HALLE . When the National Socialists came to power, Friedlaender-Wildenhain's career as a porcelain designer in Germany came to an abrupt end. She moved to the Netherlands and opened a small but successful pottery studio. In 1940 she emigrated to the USA.

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GERHARD MARCKS (1889-1981)

Bauhaus professor Gerhard Marcks was one of the most important German sculptors of the 20th century. With his work he manifested the convergence of art and pure functional form - as realized at the Bauhaus. From 1929 to 1938, Marcks designed style-defining pieces for the manufactory, such as the confectionery bowl set, which set new standards with its clear design language and functionality.

KARL FRIEDRICH SCHINKEL (1781-1841)

Karl Friedrich Schinkel had a lasting influence on the architecture of classicist Prussia. The multi-talented artist also achieved outstanding achievements in the areas of interior architecture, design and painting. Schinkel's clear formal language and departure from the sweeping curves of the Baroque were in harmony with the Prussian Enlightenment. Especially in the years 1818 to 1831, the Royal Porcelain Manufactory created a treasure trove of models based on Schinkel's designs that has not lost any of its importance. One example is the classicist Schinkel basket with delicately openwork wickerwork. Schinkel designed it in 1820 on behalf of the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm III. It is still elaborately manufactured in the factory today.

JOHANN GOTTFRIED SCHADOW (1764-1850)

Karl Friedrich Schinkel had a lasting influence on the architecture of classicist Prussia. The multi-talented artist also achieved outstanding achievements in the areas of interior architecture, design and painting. Schinkel's clear formal language and departure from the sweeping curves of the Baroque were in harmony with the Prussian Enlightenment. Especially in the years 1818 to 1831, the Royal Porcelain Manufactory created a treasure trove of models based on Schinkel's designs that has not lost any of its importance. One example is the classicist Schinkel basket with delicately openwork wickerwork. Schinkel designed it in 1820 on behalf of the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm III. It is still elaborately manufactured in the factory today.