Rona Kobel, who was born in Freiburg in 1982 and studied at the University of the Arts in Berlin, creates her shiny objects with political clout from unique KPM porcelain. In the limited works "couRAGE" and "Freedoom", the artist designs each unique piece by hand and uses a subtle trick that helps the Jewish designer Marguerite Friedlaender to make a quiet comeback.

The artist Rona Kobel
(Photo: Trevor Good)

COURAGE

“couRAGE” appears in white full bisque and metallic luster color, limited to 15 and 9 pieces respectively. The relief letters of the biscuit version extend over the entire height of the vase and were handcrafted by the artist in varying thicknesses.

"Transposing unpleasant topics in noble material - that creates irritation. Packing horror moments and stories in something as beautiful, as precious and valuable as porcelain brings special attention, the three-dimensionality forces us to confront it and our flooding with the media is broken - We’ll look again.” - Rona Kobel

"Transposing unpleasant topics in noble material - that creates irritation. Packing horror moments and stories in something as beautiful, as precious and valuable as porcelain brings special attention, the three-dimensionality forces us to confront it and our flooding with the media is broken - We’ll look again.”
- Rona Kobel

Read the entire interview here

"Translating unpleasant topics into noble material - that creates irritation. Packing horror moments and stories in something as beautiful, as precious and valuable as porcelain brings special attention, the three-dimensionality forces us to confront it and our flooding with the media is broken - We’ll look again.” - Rona Kobel

The KPM+ Rona Kobel Vase Hall 3 “couRAGE” Mirror was limited to 15 pieces and is no longer available.

FREEDOM

“Freedoom” comes in 5 colors and is limited to 9 pieces each. The sugar-sweet effect of the objects only lasts for a short moment until you become aware of the desperate eyes in the double O - which in the pistachio green version are even pierced and can therefore cry. The artist completed each unique piece by hand.

"PUBLICITY, FAME AND LIGHTLIGHT ARE AS FLEET AS CLOUDS, BUT A GOOD VESSEL WILL LAST FOR CENTURIES."
- wrote Friedlaender in her autobiography, published in 1973

About the hall form

In 1931, Marguerite Friedlaender designed the HALLE vase, an icon of the Bauhaus tradition in its proportions, lines and simple curve. But the Jewish designer was initially denied due recognition with the rise of National Socialism.